The Framing Effect: Simple Tweaks to Stop Losing Money

Imagine you’ve got a deadline to meet.

It’s been 15 days out of the 30 you were initially given. You’re working slow and steady; after all, you’ve got two weeks left.

The next morning, you’re talking to a few friends over an early lunch at your favorite restaurant. Everyone is sharing what’s going on in their lives — birthdays, projects, travels, etc., — you mention the project you’ve been working on and how you’re happy with your progress.

Your friend John — always the pessimist — explodes when you tell him you’ve got two weeks to finish.

To him, it’s not two weeks left, it’s two weeks already used up that you can’t get back. It’s two weeks gone which you could’ve used to finish the project.

It’s two weeks you’re using to pursue one thing when you could’ve pursued multiple things.

To John, you’re in trouble and need to pick up the pace.

You leave the lunch date anxious and worried about whether or not you’ll meet the deadline. You’re also thinking about the opportunity cost of not being more productive.

You no longer have two weeks. You’ve burnt two weeks.

What happened here is a classic case of the framing effect. You and John were both expressing the same information but in different ways. John framed it negatively and you framed it positively.

By simply changing the way the problem was presented, you became more risk-averse or more risk-prone.

The framing effect is a powerful tool we’ve been using it for thousands of years to convince and convert.

Keep reading to learn more about framing and how you can use it to stop losing subscribers (and money).

 

The framing effect is simply the way you present information

 

The framing effect is an example of a cognitive bias, in which people react to a particular choice in different ways depending on how it’s presented; e.g. as a loss or as a gain. People tend to avoid risk when a positive frame is presented but seek risks when a negative frame is presented. Gain and loss are defined in the scenario as descriptions of outcomes (e.g. lives lost or saved, disease patients treated and not treated, lives saved and lost during accidents, etc.).(source)

The Framing effect is something each and every one of us uses in our everyday lives. We use it to structure arguments with our friends, family, and colleagues. We use the framing Effect when we’re negotiating, talking about problems, or even seducing.

It’s ubiquitous, but many of us don’t even know what we’re doing. Framing was formally identified as a cognitive bias by psychologists

Framing was formally identified as a cognitive bias by psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky.

The Experiment That Got Everyone Talking About Framing

 

The original experiment asked students to make a decision in a hypothetical situation. They would be required to save lives or allow lives to be lost.

Imagine that the U.S. is preparing for the outbreak of an unusual Asian disease, which is expected to kill 600 people. Two alternative programs to combat the disease have been proposed. Assume that the exact scientific estimate of the consequences of the programs are as follows

When the situation was framed with a chance of saving lives, people were less likely to take risks (positive framing).

If Program A is adopted, 200 people will be saved. [72 percent]

If Program B is adopted, there is 1/3 probability that 600 people will be saved, and 2/3 probability that no people will be saved. [28 percent]

Another Group was given the same cover story, but the loss of life was emphasized and people became more risk prone (negative framing).

If Program C is adopted 400 people will die. [22 percent]

If Program D is adopted there is 1/3 probability that nobody will die, and 2/3 probability that 600 people will die. [78 percent]

Even though the absolute value of all these situations is 200 people surviving, the way each situation was presented had a huge impact on how people decided.

Positive frames create an environment that avoids risk-taking and proactive behavior.

Negative frames create an environment that causes people to take more risk.

Have you ever watched two news stations at the same time?

Watch a station like BBC or CNN while watching Aljazeera.

Compare and contrast what they’re reporting and what they’re not reporting. Also look at how they frame stories that appear on both stations.

It’s eye opening.

Framing has worked in propaganda since man has been able to communicate. It’s not always so overt or even intentional.

Take the controversy over the U.K. ballot to leave the E.U. — The Brexit.

The original wording on the question was:

"Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union?"

It would have prompted a simple yes or no, but complaints were made over the question being biased or confusing. U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron accepted a recommendation to change the wording after the phrasing was tested on potential campaigners, academics, and language experts.

The final wording on the question was:

Get Insightful Content Like This Delivered Straight to Your Inboox

“Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?”

The options that led to the fateful decision were:

Remain a member of the European Union

Leave the European Union

(Source)

When you frame a situation a certain way, it forms a reference point. We’re irrevocably tied to reference points which in turn create expectations about outcomes.


Enter the expectation effect, the logical progression of framing


The expectation effect, also known as the subject expectancy effect, is the way behavior, perceptions, and results change as a result of personal expectations or the expectations of those around us.

As soon as you think it’s possible then the belief creates a higher chance of it occurring.

Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you’ll start having positive results. –Willie Nelson.

You’re familiar with many instances of the expectation effect due to positive or negative framing. You just didn’t know what was happening until now.

  • Hawthorne Effect: Workers are more productive when given more attention during a test or change to their work environment that’s SUPPOSED to improve productivity. The effect is temporary.
  • Pygmalion Effect: Individuals perform better or worse depending on the expectations of their superiors.
  • Placebo Effect: One of the most common and widely studied applications of the expectation effect. Patients — based on the belief that treatment will work — receive treatment benefits.
  • Halo Effect: Positive feelings in one area cause inconsequential or neutral traits to be viewed positively. In English, positive attitudes associated with a brand’s marketing can spread from one product or service to another aspect or thing. E.g., from using new software to the amount you’re improving your business.

To create the right expectations, your framing of the situation needs to be credible.

In a marketing situation, you can’t hope to build the right expectations if the context you use to frame your solution isn’t congruent.

For example, if you framed your solution as a stripped down version of popular accounting software, your customers won’t expect it to do much more than the basic accounting functions they need to keep their finances in order. If you — for some reason — begin to market it as an all-in-one system, there’ll be problems with their expectations.

If you — for some reason — begin to market it as an all-in-one system, there’ll be problems with their expectations.

To set the right expectations in a group, frame the situation correctly from the beginning.

Now that you have a very clear understanding of the framing effect, it’s time to use it to become incredibly persuasive.

Four Types of Framing to Bring About Your Desired Action

 

Loss Framing

Loss framing is also known as the negative framing effect and is simple to understand. If you’ve ever come across a landing page that uses a timer then you know what loss framing is.

Don’t lose $100 every month on groceries, enroll in our exclusive shoppers club.

You don’t want to lose the opportunity to ….

Don’t lose your home because you “didn’t know,” call us today….

The common thread here is fear. Fear of potential loss.

Loss aversion describes people’s tendency to strongly avoid losses to acquiring gain. Keeping your house is more important than buying a new one.

http://youtu.be/0FbwPcsQl1A

Contrary to popular belief, it’s pretty simple to frame novel products. Instead of focusing on only it’s novelty — always a hard sell — you can focus on what it’ll prevent them from losing.

Facebook prevents you from losing contact with your friends and family.

AirBnB prevents you from losing money on huge hotel bills while experiencing a new city.

The video below shows how loss frame and gain frame can be used in medical screening.

http://youtu.be/on2ai4Okp0E

 

When to use it

The answer depends on your audience and the attitudes they have towards the product. Loss-framed messages work best when the outcome is less certain. It helps remove attention from the ambiguity of the situation and refocus it on what they lose by not choosing you.

In the context of buying your product, you can say “don’t lose $250 every month on insurance. Buy xxx.” Instead of “save $250 every month by buying xxx.”

When possible, present two options.

  • Buying your product
  • A sure loss

This’ll put them in a risk-taking state of mind and make them more likely to take a chance on you.

The same applies to personal situations. If you’re trying to convince someone to take a less than certain risk — a cross-country road trip. You can frame the argument to highlight all the things they stand to lose like opportunity, experiences, meeting new people, and memories.

 

Gain Framing

Gain framing is most effective when the benefits of your product, argument, or situation are obvious to the other person. Positive framing is another way to describe it.

Learn a new skill and advance in your career…

Treehouse uses gain framing in their YouTube advertisements.

http://youtu.be/Wnr8LRO7CiA

They have a few different variations, but they’re all showing you the same thing. Someone who was working in a field they didn’t find rewarding took a few classes through Treehouse.

After that, they were able to get high paying jobs. You can do the same if you sign up for a program with Treehouse. You can gain a whole new career and financial freedom.

Dentist’s also use gain framing a lot. Take the video below:

http://youtu.be/MT6WneRYSh8

They’re pretty much selling you the world and then some, but you have to start with your smile  (Honestly, I had no idea a smile could do everything under the sun until I watched this video).

When to use it

When the outcome is clear and easy to illustrate, gain framing is the best type of framing effect to use. They’re more persuasive than loss-framed messages because the outcome doesn’t require your prospect to think too much.

For example,

You can easily say get fifty percent more on your tax return when you choose us.

For me, that’s a no-brainer.

Statistical Framing

Statistical framing is arguably the most abused type of framing effect. It relies heavily on data to influence decisions. You can use statistics to create a negatively framed or positively framed message.

I can say my product works 90% of the time while a competitor can say it fails 10% of the time.

Both statements are strictly true, but deliver a very different meaning to the person receiving it.

The video below shows how marketers have been abusing statistics for years.

http://youtu.be/hYy8oBUscmU

Long ago, political aspirants mastered the art of statistical framing. The video below is from the 2012 presidential campaign which pitted Mitt Romney against Barack Obama.

The facts presented are strictly true, but the context only tells a part of the story. Obama presents facts and frames them in the context that best suits him. It fails to tell the whole story.

http://youtu.be/33NT0_MgsVU

Prosecutors are also known for using statistics to frame arguments in what’s known as the prosecutor’s fallacy.

When to Use it

Statistical framing is one of the most versatile framing effects because it’s easily coupled with positive or negative framing.

You can use it in your marketing messages to show social proof in a positive frame e.g., 7,345 smart people just like you have signed up for our newsletter.

Since 7,345 people have already signed up, there must be something there.

You can also use it the same way Mitt Romney and Barack Obama did. It’s always fun to pick a fight with the competition.

Note: never pick a fight with someone who’s considered David when you’re Goliath — we still believe in fair play.

Language and Imagery Framing

Let’s not forget about the imagery and power words you can use to have a profound effect on the frame of your message. Copywriters have been using words and imagery to frame powerful messages for decades.

In The Adweek Copywriting Handbook (formerly known as Advertising Secrets of the Written Word) Joe Sugarman says:

“Your ad layout and the first few paragraphs of your ad must create the buying environment most conducive to the sale of your product or service.” 

For your website, that means your words need to sell and your imagery needs to back them up.

I’m a fan of design; I’m always making small tweaks to my website to figure out what’s working best and what’s not. My design is always second to the copy.

You can use words and imagery that appeal to the emotional center of the brain. When your design backs up your imagery, you give a stronger sense of stability, sophistication, and trustworthiness.

If you’re a young exciting clothing brand, you should have words and images that support your branding.

Vibram Kills it with their five fingers campaign.

A stroll through an apple store is very different than a stroll through an AT&T store. Apple gives you a feeling of class and sophistication while AT&T gives you a feeling of utility. Neither is inherently better than the other. It’s the frame created through the imagery and language used.

Drop your visitor into an environment that encourages one behavior and discourages another.

I read the story that Cantor Fine Art created (and watched the video).

They use compelling imagery, music, and a powerful narrative to sell their art.

When to Use It

Imagery and language are staples.

When you can, insert a video of someone using your products. If there’s no video insert images of your product in action.

In lieu of both these options, tell a story about your products and how they made someone — or even you — a better version of themselves.

One of the most powerful ways to use language and imagery to test out framing is when you’re running A/B tests.

Instead of looking at A/B testing as changing the color of a button from red to white, look at it through the eyes of your visitor.

Maybe the problem isn’t the button; the problem may be the way the information is presented or the actual information that’s presented.

For example, someone landed on your wedding dresses page and you’re showing wedding dresses from actual events. Your visitor wants to see the wedding dresses that are in stock. Because of that, she’ll bounce from the page and won’t call.

On the other hand, if you show wedding dresses in stock, she’ll be more likely to call you and discuss alterations or a fitting.

Language and imagery are indispensable. Period.

It’s your turn

 

We’ve looked at the framing effect from many different angles in this article and you’ve seen how it works in the wild.

Stop reading and take a deep look at the framing of your messages. Are they giving you the most bang for your buck?

Statistics, are you using as well as you should be?

Are you setting the right expectations from the beginning?

Would you benefit more from a positive frame or a negative frame?

Is your language compelling and does your imagery work to back it up?

The framing effect is everywhere and we use it ALL the time — both consciously and unconsciously.

Use the framing effect to your advantage and stop losing your audience and customers.

Thank You Page Marketing: 6 Hacks to Increase Engagement


Have you ever been on a website, saw an irresistible offer, got it, and felt disappointed in the thank you page?

Instead of continuing an incredible interaction, the relationship becomes sterile and transactional. The thank you page is an often neglected part of your website. It’s just something you have to create – right?

Not exactly. It’s a backbone of human interaction. Whether it’s receiving a gift or asking for a favor, there’s one thing we almost always say, thank you. For most of us, it’s a reflex.

When it comes to saying ‘thank you’ on the web, there’s no difference. Well, there’s one difference, you can generate revenue from saying thank you the right way.

How?

With your thank you page. They’re an important but overlooked way to continue the interaction with people who’ve taken your desired action.

By the end of this article, you’ll learn how to make thank you pages that create loyal fans, generate revenue, and produce tons of goodwill for your brand.

Let’s get started

What is a thank you page?

A thank you page is where your new subscribers or customers are taken after submitting their information through your opt-in form or sales page.

In simple terms, this is the page saying “Thank you for performing my desired action. Here’s what you should do next.”The thank you page is valuable because it acknowledges and confirms the action was the right one.

This taps into the psychological principle known as the confirmation bias. People look for signs and information that confirm their preexisting beliefs. They believe they made the right choice by taking your desired action. You let them know they’re right.

Moving forward, they’ll associate those positive thoughts with your brand. The entire process happens on a subconscious level. Below is an example of a what a simple thank you page could look like.

thank you page image

 

Types of thank you pages you should be using

There are many ways to go about crafting your thank you page. What you choose, will, of course, depend on your goals. Throughout the rest of this article, we’ll explore the different ways you can use thank you pages for maximum impact.  

Include a video on your thank you page

The fastest way to grasp something is by doing it. The next best thing is to visualize it. You can capitalize on this fact.

Videos give your audience something to do while waiting. Use this opportunity to confirm they took the right action as well as move them towards the next step in your funnel.

A simple introductory statement is all you need:

An email is racing towards you, check your inbox in a few minutes.  Meanwhile, watch the short video below.

Xcube Labs not only puts a video on their page, they convey a lot of information to their new subscriber.

The video doesn’t talk much about the white paper. Instead, it focuses on Xcube’s thought processes and principles when designing.

At times, people keep the confirmation and delivery emails delayed on purpose. That way, they won’t be distracted from the message on the thank you page.

Videos encourage longer dwell times and (mostly) have a positive impact on the person interacting with them. When they’re well crafted, it encourages them to dive deeper into your content.

Use a video marketing tool like Wistia to get granular metrics on the performance of your videos. The Longer someone stays on a page, the more engaged they are.

Types of video to use on thank you page

  • Welcome video
  • An informational video that tells them what to expect
  • Video that lets the subscriber know what the next steps are
  • Video that showcases a low-cost product

Try shorter videos and continue to adjust the content until you’re satisfied with the result.

Ask your visitor to subscribe to different platforms

Your primary goal with this tactic is to increase your following. This is the best time to take make a small ask because your subscribers will never be this engaged with you again.

Use this page to generate maximum results with minimum effort. Users have already shown they appreciate what you’re offering. Now is a great time to ask them to connect with you on social media.

You can ask them to:

  • Follow you on FB
  • Connect with you  on Snapchat
  • Subscribe to your YouTube channel for more content like this
  • Etc

Here’s an example from Pixabay.

We also do it at KyLeads.

Social media is a great place to spread the word about your brand. Your thank you page helps you build the following that’ll give you solid social proof.

Benefits of driving engagement to your social channels:

  • Provide promotion for your product.
  • A great avenue to connect with your new users/subscribers.
  • Users can share your link in their timeline.

Give subscribers limited time offers and discounts

The fact that you have subscribers means you’re doing something right. Make them an offer they can’t refuse. Or at least make one they’ll have to think about before saying no.

Offer them a limited edition discount voucher. Or maybe, get something that is exclusive to new subscribers. The idea is to provide incentives, and the main concern is to make it clear: it’s a one-time deal. It won’t be available again no matter where they register.

A one-time offer is used to increase sales by offering incentive’s that aren’t available anywhere else. The key is to make sure it’s not available through some other means.

If you slip up on that part, the people who took advantage of it will feel cheated.

For example, you can try selling your eBook at 25% off if the purchase is made from that page in a certain amount of time. Make it clear that the eBook won’t be available at that price point ever again.

If they’re at all intrigued with your offer, you just gave them a solid reason why they should be paying for a product right away.

Tips on when to use discounts on thank you page and how to structure them

  • Look out for a product to sell from the thank you page that’s similar to what the user is registering for.
  • Be honest regarding the ideology that this is the cheapest you can purchase your product (that means don’t offer the same thing cheaper somewhere else).
  • Incentives play an important role. Try to make them as exclusive as possible for the subscribers on your thank you page.

Check out this example below.

The experiment thank you page with coupon code

If you dial in the offer correctly, you have a buyer coming your way.

Get subscribers to fill out a survey

Prepare a quick and short survey. Present it to the people who just signed up by placing it on your thank you page. Since they’ve already taken one of your desired actions, they’re more likely to do it again.

Pro tip: Ask the user to fill the survey to unlock a free e-book or other bonus.

There’s a reason you do this. When someone subscribes to be a member of your audience or buys something, you only have a finite amount of information about them. Sure, you could segment based on what they downloaded or bought, but why not ask them to segment themselves.

In your survey, you can ask many questions:

  • How did they find you
  • What they’re trying to accomplish
  • What they do for a living
  • Etc etc

This will give you deep insights into who’s visiting your website. There are many popular survey tools like SurveyMonkey or Slamingsurveys. We’re also building in the ability to survey with KyForms – stay tuned.

But always remember, there’s a fine line between asking your customers to take a survey and irritating them.

The above example shows you exactly how to use a survey on your thank you page.

Here are some quick tips to make an effective thank you page survey:

  • Keep it short and simple.
  • Ask direct questions.
  • Where possible, stick to multiple choice questions.
  • Ask one question at a time.
  • Ask questions they don’t have to think too hard to answer (instead of “describe your ideal day,” ask “are you looking to improve x”)

Send users to helpful links

Your subscribers went through your content and subscribed. They love what you’re doing. Now, give them more of what they want. It’s the best time to showcase your other products/featured content.

Here’s how you can do this:

Create pages that highlight the most useful content on your website. Divide it into different sections.

For example, if you have a fitness brand, you can group the links by:
–              Strength training
–              Cardio
–              Healthy eating

Add a short description and link to these useful resources.

Note: You should already have the categories through your blog. All you’re doing is curing the best in each category.

Take a look at this example from ByRegina below.

thank you page by regina

The main premise is that users have already opted in to get more content. Why make them wait? Showcase the best you have to offer right away.

Display testimonials

Payments done online are a bit different from the traditional market. Mainly because it’s less concrete and more threatening. That’s why trust is essential.

One of the fastest ways to gain trust is by showcasing what other people are saying about your brand. Remember the confirmation bias? If done correctly, this will add value and reduce buyer remorse.

Here’s an example of this in action:

This will help reinforce the positive feelings they’ve already associated with your brand.

People won’t hesitate before buying if they trust you. Whether they stick around is another story.

Conclusion

The whole point of customizing a thank you page is to make your funnel more efficient. In other words, it’s meant to continue the process of building a meaningful relationship.

What we’ve given you here are a few ways to get started. Some techniques will work better than others. The key is to keep testing until you find a winner.

Thank you pages are, most of the time, underused. Figuring out your thank you page may result in a huge upside if done correctly.

Let us know about any techniques you’re using in the comments section.

Optimizing for Humans: Create a Brand That’s Loved

It’s about time we started optimizing for humans.

I started my journey into all things digital a little under a decade ago. What works has changed.

It was easier to get an email address. It was harder for people to pay for things.

There weren’t so many digital services. It was hard as hell to get a payment processor that you liked.

Building a website was a grueling process. Now, It takes all of twenty minutes from domain purchase to going live.

One thing that’s remained the same is our inexorable march towards adapting offline interactions to an online world. Personalization, live chat, and user experience advocates reflect this shift.

The path has been anything but straight. It reminds me of the line success takes.

success looks like in optimizing for humans

 

We’re not where we need to be. Not by a long shot. We’re well on the way to getting there. There’s no turning back at this point.

Yes, the barrier to entry for a digital brand is lower. At the same time, the barrier to success has been raised. Startups have millions in funding, growth teams, and advanced analytics.

The bootstrapped company, the blogger, and the solopreneur have the same tools on the surface. The topical view is rarely accurate. Can you implement all the tactics, analyze the data, read all the books, and chase growth at all costs?

No, you can’t.

That’s why it’s important to optimize for humans.

A quick primer on the journey of web optimization

There have been a number of loose phases when it comes to how people optimize on the web. I’ve split them into three.

Optimized for sales

The first phase was about chasing a quick buck. The techniques were more or less copied and pasted from direct response marketing. You had the long pages, the underlined words, the fear of losing, the psychological triggers, and everything in between.

Now, don’t get me wrong. My constant companions were (and are) The Gary Halbert Letters, The Robert Collier Letter Book, and The AdWeek Copywriting Handbook.

Great resources.

I recommend them until this day.

The methods they employ are effective. Gary has personality for days. Robert has countless templates you can adapt to email. The Copywriting Handbook is just that, a handbook to be used. They’re best suited to the Wild West era of the web when everything was focused on the visitors who would convert on the first interaction.

It’s a bit different now. It takes multiple interactions to get a conversion. Adopt the fundamentals from them, those will never expire. Everything else can be tossed. I mean the tactics. Tactics are for specific situations.

Strategy is timeless.

Optimized for search

After the web came to its senses and realized it was more profitable for Google to send them traffic, they optimized for search. All you had to do was send a thousand spammy links to your site, keyword stuff the title, and you’d be ranking in a few days.

The quality of the sites on the first page of Google were, to say the least, poor. Real sites whose owners didn’t understand the intricacies of Search were pushed to the second, third, and fourth pages.

A whole industry sprung up around optimizing for search engines. Many times, they preyed on business owners who didn’t know any better.

They basically said “Look, SEO is hard. Give us thousands of dollars and in a few months we might be able to help you rank. No guarantees.” Imagine if your accountant told you that when you asked if your books were in order.

Today, the practitioners are called SEO’s, publications are dedicated to news about SEO, and it’s no longer about stuffing keywords in the title.

Google is a billion dollar company. Another billion dollar industry sprung up around them. They like their billions.

People were tired of search results that sent them to useless websites with direct response sales tactics. Internet users are utilitarian. If the app isn’t benefiting them, they’ll drop it in a heartbeat.

The Big G figured this out. They had two options:

    1.      Lose billions of dollars because they weren’t useful

    2.     Give prominence to websites that were useful to their product (if you’re not paying for an awesome service then you’re the product. Google is awesome. We’re the product.).

They chose the latter. They spearheaded the phase we’re currently in.

Optimizing for humans

Every blogger, corporation, and small business owner has begun to optimize for humans. It’s evident when you look around. Facebook tells you when your friends have birthdays. Google shows you results based on the ones you clicked in the past. Amazon sends you emails based on your browsing history.

Even small companies are doing it. Emails have your name in the text, they remember your birthday, and you’re shown offers based on the content you interact with (at least that’s how it’s supposed to work).

Going further, service on the internet has begun to mirror service in real life. Organizations are reaching out to users to have real conversations. Like, they’re asking to schedule phone calls so they can figure out how to serve you better.

Net promoter score was implemented to figure out how people feel about your company and why.

It allows us to ideate, launch, and iterate in the blink of an eye. We’ve adopted an approach that allows us to create in the open. We share our failures and successes with the world. GE did it with their icemaker Opal on IndieGogo.

The end result?

Brands are humanized.

It’s no longer a big corporation calling the shots. Rather, it’s a hundred thousand individuals plotting the course iteration after iteration. If you, my customer, doesn’t like it, I won’t spend countless dollars trying to get you to like it.

Consumers have countless options in every field. They wield the power. It’s no longer enough to optimize for sales or search. Those things matter and they always will. You’re in business to make money.

The approach is what’s different.

We’re optimizing, first and foremost, for humans. When you put their wants, needs, hopes, dreams, and ambitions at the forefront then you’re better able to serve them. If you’re better able to serve, they’ll be more willing to pay premium prices.

The more happy customers you have the more you can acquire.

It’s a virtuous cycle.

It all starts with a decision – to focus your company on humans. To optimize communication, marketing, and products for humans.

KyLeads is a product focused on conversion rate optimization. It allows our customers to build opt-in forms and quizzes to get more email subscribers and generate more revenue.

It’s a tool.

If it’s used incorrectly then it won’t be worth the price of the subscription. It’ll be just another expense. If it’s used correctly then its ROI will be evident from the first day.

We’ve made optimizing for humans a way of life at our company. Everything from the way we design features to the topics we write about is focused on humans.

The next step is to empower our customers to do the same and reap the rewards.

Introducing Optimizing for Humansa blog on marketing, conversion rate optimization, growth, and startup lessons. You’ll learn about our wins and losses, how to spread your message the way people want to receive it, and everything in between.

Sometimes it’ll be a short piece on an insight we just gained. Other times it’ll be an in-depth post about a marketing strategy. At all times, it’ll take you further down the path of optimizing for humans and reaping the benefits that come with it.

Final thoughts

The web is changing – fast. Tactics come and go every week. What remains are the fundamentals. Humans like to be treated like humans. They’ll forgive almost anything else.

We’re dedicated to empowering you to walk the walk and talk the talk of putting your customers first. In the process, we’re opening all our doors and showing you what works, what doesn’t and everything in between.

Join us on the journey by signing up for our newsletter – a piece of humanity – to get exclusive content and a weekly article.

Exit Intent Popup